Antivirus and firewalls home in on the processor

September 10, 2010

fire

Surprise!

Intel Corporation just acquired McAfee on 20th August 2010.

What should we make of that? Does it mean the next generation of antivirus will come on a chip from Intel, well why not…doing that comes with a few advantages to Intel:

  • Because antiviruses need to be updated all the time, it means Intel will have a good reason to access and receive information from all the PCs using these new chips.
  • Maybe, but what if Intel designs a chip that carries out all of the incredibly complex algorithms and other heuristic calculations that invariably slow down our PCs? Rather like Macs, iPhones and iPads have always handled all display calculations on a separate chipset, leaving all the main processor gigaflops to the applications. Wouldn’t it be great if we didn’t have to hang around while our antivirus sucks up precious memory and processor power to check the file we just downloaded…

As the Cloud builds up steam, Intel are preparing for the thin, thin client and the powerful, powerful server because they know that security will be the defining factor in the success of Cloud Computing.

When we access all our files, music, videos, applications from the Cloud…through what will basically be a terminal, an Antivirus/Firewall chipset will be the only solution, because if you have to download it from the Cloud, who knows what new virus will come with it every morning…

Clever move, Intel!

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Cloud sheds backup

July 26, 2010

Look out George! Next time, you might get hit by an EMC backup server falling out of a cloud.

just missed the piano

Just before the piano fell

Companies seem to have voted with their feet and EMC recently announced they are pulling their “Cloud backup  service” Atmos out of the Cloud because not enough customers are interested.

Why on earth would one need Cloud backup if one has Cloud applications!? In fact, come to think of it, EMC should be offering the exact opposite: old fashioned physical backup for Cloud applications…It just goes to show that Cloudwashing isn’t enough. Before you put something in the cloud and offer it to your clients, one would be advised to check whether there is any demand for it.


Back to the future with IBM?

July 26, 2010

From system370-168 to zEnterprise

An IBM 370-168 mainframe, state of the art in the early 80's

Should we be calling IBM Big Green?

So here we are back to 40 years ago when IBM’s revenue mainly came from renting computer power to customers who connected their thousands of 5250 or 3270 terminals to mainframes using unbelievably slow modems that were each the size of a small desktop computer.

At the time, I was a Computer Science student and spent some time as an intern at IBM France. I participated in installing what was then the largest mainframe in France: an IBM 370/168 (it later became the zSeries) that had a whopping 512 Megabytes of RAM (yes kids…512Mb…stop laughing please…) and stacks of 3330 removable hard disks that could each store 200Mb of data on 8 platters (stop LOL).

Guess what: IBM has just announced they are reviving their System z strategy with the zEnterprise 196.And nobody is laughing this time.

What has changed?: it has 3 Terabytes of RAM,up to 96 processors, reams of blades and can manage loads of P and X servers. IBM says 30% of all servers are running Linux, and that the zEnterprise should soon support Windows clients. 40 years ago, the internal bus of an average computer probably ran slower than today’s high speed ADSL, SDSL etc…(why have you stopped laughing?)

Although total cost of acquisition (TCA) will be higher then for servers, TCO is lower within 3 years. Not to speak of the green side of things, these machines are much more energy efficient than a pile of servers.

If you still think Cloud Computing is a pie in the sky, think again because IBM certainly want to be at the forefront of the next paradigm shift.


Should Carlsberg get a prize for innovative marketing?

December 3, 2007

carlsberg_litter1.jpg

Carlsberg seem to be specializing in alternative marketing. Last August, they littered the streets of London with £5,000 worth of £10 and £20 banknotes with a sticker on them saying “Carlsberg don’t do litter. But if they did it would probably be the best litter in the world“. Click here to check it out!

  • Cost: 400 green stickers, someone to chuck bank notes on the pavement and £5,000 worth of banknotes.
  • Result: certainly hundreds of thousands of people (if not millions) talking about Carlsberg.

The other day, I received a “Gift” from a Facebook pal: it was a picture of a bottle of Carlsberg. Of course, it was posted to my Funwall, and everyone found it great fun and the bottle certainly started circulating at hyper-speed round the Facebook-world.

  • Cost: you name it! one photo, 10 minutes on Photoshop to turn it into just the bottle, AND THAT’S ALL. We all did the rest!
  • Result: …how many people have a Facebook account these days?

Clever!…sounds like beer makes you smarter!